A hike to the Kehlsteinhaus is rewarded with an amazing panoramic view of the Berchtesgadener Land and the area around Salzburg.
Kehlsteinhaus

Hitler’s tea room

At a height of 1,834 metres, Kehlsteinhaus is a historical lookout high above Berchtesgaden, offering a stunning panoramic view.

Kehlsteinhaus was completed in 1938. Among other purposes, it was intended for the entertainment of official guests during the dictatorship, which is why it was also referred to as the “Teehaus” (tea room). In fact, Adolf Hitler himself rarely visited the Kehlsteinhaus: it is thought that the journey to get there was considered too long and too risky.

The Kehlsteinhaus – today a mountain restaurant – has been retained in its original form as a historical monument from the Third Reich, and is among the most popular destinations for trips in Germany. Its location permits a unique view from the terrace, over the Berchtesgaden alpine landscape and the area around Salzburg.

However, it is important to regard it not simply as a lookout point and beauty spot, but also as an admonishment and reminder of the atrocities of the inhuman National Socialist regime.

Kehlsteinstraße, which leads to the Eagle’s Nest – as the Allies referred to the property after the Second World War – is inaccessible to private traffic. Buses take visitors to the viewing platform, and a 124-metre-long tunnel leads from there to a brass-lined lift in which guests travel 124 metres up into the Kehlsteinhaus.

All the information on opening times, guides, and how to travel up to the Kehlsteinhaus is available at www.kehlsteinhaus.de

Video: Lakes & Mountains

Tip: Anyone planning a day trip to the state of Berchtesgaden should rise early, as the trip from Munich takes around two hours.

 

 

Photos and Video: Tobias Schnorpfeil, Carolin Unrath