Hofbräukeller

Surrounded by ancient chestnut trees

Located on the banks of the Isar river, Hofbräukeller (Hofbräu Beer Cellar) is an institution in the Haidhausen district. Its history goes hand-in-hand with Munich’s beer-brewing tradition. 

Before Carl von Linde invented the refrigerator in 1871, Munich’s brewers needed a cool way to store their beer. They therefore dug large beer cellars and found that the best place to do so was the banks of the Isar in the Haidhausen district due to the high water table and natural caves.

Chestnut trees provided additional shade, keeping the beer cellars cool even during the summer. And because these cellars were located outside of the city’s walls, beer could be delivered to the surrounding area even quicker.

In those days, brewers used to serve their beer right on the premises, though they were not innkeepers as we would know them. The king tolerated these makeshift bars and it didn’t take long for Munich’s world-famous beer garden culture to evolve.

The Neo-Renaissance Hofbräukeller was built on the banks of the Isar at the end of the 19th century. And its world-famous Hofbräu beer is still served there to this day. If you fancy enjoying traditional Bavarian specialities, like Schweinebraten (roast pork) or Käsespätzle (cheese noodles), with your beer, then the restaurant is the place for you.

In warm weather, the beer garden, surrounded by ancient chestnut trees, creates an oasis of green on the busy square of Wiener Platz. Hearty Bavarian treats are available from the self-service counters or you can even bring your own Brotzeit (a traditional snack of meat, bread and cheese), as is customary in Munich beer gardens.

Families with children are welcome at Hofbräukeller, too. Depending on the weather, there is a playroom in the bar or an outdoor playground in the beer garden with specialist staff to keep an eye on your little ones.

www.hofbraeukeller.de

 

 

Photo: Tommy Loesch